How to write your resume so you will be selected for an interview!

Applying on line is so easy these days that companies are inundated by resumes of both qualified, and unqualified, candidates. A typical fortune 500 company receives thousands of resumes in one week. Whether you’re accustomed to working with recruiters, human resources or talent acquisition teams, there are some things that they want to see on your resume.

Pull out your resume right now and as you read this article, and make the necessary changes to your resume. Remember, you should always add to your resume as you work on key projects, so you don’t forget to include crucial details that may be a differentiator of why you get asked for an interview. You never know when a reduction in force or sale of a company is going to occur. Take the time to invest in yourself now and keep your resume up to date.

How your resume is selected for an interview

Unique formatting with 3 different types of fonts and 2 graphics do not usually import correctly to the applicant systems that almost every company today uses. The reality is that companies today receive your resume through an applicant tracking system (ATS). Once in the ATS, a keyword search for the skills for a specific job search is done in the applicant tracking system, and that is what brings your resume to the top to be reviewed. Your most important information should be able to fit onto the recruiters/talent acquisition/HR first computer screen. Your professional summary and current role are what they will be reviewing. It is critical to make the first page grab their attention!

Brag on yourself

Explain what you did at each job and what the results were. If there are cost savings, process improvements, or other efficiencies, include them in your resume! List what you accomplished. Do not exaggerate your skills, but feel free to brag on what you have accomplished, because your resume is what gets you to the interview phase.

Be transparent

If you weren’t working for a time, explain why that was, don’t try to hide it. Maybe because of a downturn in the economy you were out of work for a while. Perhaps you had to quit your job to focus on caring for a relative. Whatever the reason, rather than trying to hide or come up with ambiguous dates to conceal the gap, explain it briefly. Do you want to risk losing an offer because during the employment verification stage they find out you hid your time off?